Apr 202010
 

The lads in Toronto fouled up big time on the disallowed Daniel Sedin goal. I think it goes without saying that everyone, including Vancouver’s most disliked CBC commentator Ron MacLean, thought that the goal should’ve counted.

Nonetheless, it’s all in the past now. The Canucks cannot and will not allow themselves to remain in the past and dwell on the fact the Daniel Sedin goal should’ve counted. If this team has learned anything over previous playoff defeats, it’s that they have to continue moving forward in a playoff series and not get caught up in all the drama that lies within it.

To be honest, I’m not as concerned as a lot of the Vancouver media are about the Canucks’ chances. It was virtually undisputed right from the get go that this series would be a long one, stretching from six to possibly seven games. It was a foregone conclusion that Los Angeles, while young, had all the tools to get past Vancouver. Drew Doughty hasn’t missed a beat since the Olympics and Jonathan Quick has been solid when called upon. Even young guns Anze Kopitar and Wayne Simmonds have played vital roles so far.

There is, however, a lot to be concerned with in regards to the penalty kill. Without a shadow of a doubt, it has been what plagued the Canucks since Game One of the series. But it’s hard to see even the Kings’ potent 60% powerplay ratio staying this way for the rest of the series. Vancouver will be looking at video footage from the last few games and they will be looking at practicing their penalty kill whenever they can. It’s not as though Alain Vigneault and the coaching staff will sit on their hands and let the Kings’ powerplay run rampant from here on out.

But most importantly, the Canucks have still been the better team 5-on-5. Even after crumbling in the second period and surrendering four unanswered goals, the disallowed Daniel goal got the club fired up and they came within one goal of tying up a game they had no business being in. It should be crystal clear in the hearts and minds of Canucks fans that this team is fully capable of dominating the play of a game… it’s just a matter of executing.

Perhaps from a mental standpoint, the Kings’ young players are now convinced they are now the favourites to win the series. It’s easy for Kings fans and their players to feel confident, but it’s equally easy for the Canucks to not get too low and continue playing their game.

Look at how the Canucks got here: The Sedins can dominate a game, and the second line can provide enough firepower to puncture the Kings’ defense. Roberto Luongo is allowed an off night every now and then but more than anything, this team can bounce back very quickly.

  • http://www.canuckshockeyblog.com J.J. Guerrero

    I don’t officially panic until we lose tomorrow night. I’d be happy to leave LA with a split and home ice advantage.

  • http://www.canuckshockeyblog.com J.J. Guerrero

    I don’t officially panic until we lose tomorrow night. I’d be happy to leave LA with a split and home ice advantage.

  • Brendan

    While it’s refreshing to finally read some positive thoughts, and while i desperately want to share in your sentiments, as you raise some good valid points, I’m finding it difficult to remain as opimistic.

    The Canucks have shown zero ability to kill penalties in this series, and while you’re right, chances are the LA power play can’t possibly keep up a success rate of 60%, the Canucks haven’t shown me any reason why it wouldn’t.

    We obviously miss Ryan Johnson and Willie Mitchell on the PK. I never valued their jobs as much as I see how we are without them. I loved Ryan Johnson, but i felt someone else would step up to fill his void. That’s what the Canucks have done all season long in dealing with injuries. Thus far, no one has stepped up to fill that void on the PK. Mitchell’s been out since January, and i still haven’t seen a player fill in for his shut-down role, although collaboratively Sami Salo, Christian Ehrhoff, and Alex Edler have done an admirable job.

    In the end it all comes down to Roberto Luongo. He has struggled with his core assets from his form, to rebound control, to all of a sudden treating the puck like it’s a live grenade when it goes towards his glove hand. Luongo’s glove hand used to be his biggest strength. Now it’s his biggest weakness. He has to find a way to hone back his core assets and get back to playing the way we expect him to. Ultimately it’s Luongo who will decide who wins this series, not special teams or 5-on-5 play. Luongo starts playing better, and all of a sudden the PK looks a lot better too.

    Cheers.

  • Brendan

    While it’s refreshing to finally read some positive thoughts, and while i desperately want to share in your sentiments, as you raise some good valid points, I’m finding it difficult to remain as opimistic.

    The Canucks have shown zero ability to kill penalties in this series, and while you’re right, chances are the LA power play can’t possibly keep up a success rate of 60%, the Canucks haven’t shown me any reason why it wouldn’t.

    We obviously miss Ryan Johnson and Willie Mitchell on the PK. I never valued their jobs as much as I see how we are without them. I loved Ryan Johnson, but i felt someone else would step up to fill his void. That’s what the Canucks have done all season long in dealing with injuries. Thus far, no one has stepped up to fill that void on the PK. Mitchell’s been out since January, and i still haven’t seen a player fill in for his shut-down role, although collaboratively Sami Salo, Christian Ehrhoff, and Alex Edler have done an admirable job.

    In the end it all comes down to Roberto Luongo. He has struggled with his core assets from his form, to rebound control, to all of a sudden treating the puck like it’s a live grenade when it goes towards his glove hand. Luongo’s glove hand used to be his biggest strength. Now it’s his biggest weakness. He has to find a way to hone back his core assets and get back to playing the way we expect him to. Ultimately it’s Luongo who will decide who wins this series, not special teams or 5-on-5 play. Luongo starts playing better, and all of a sudden the PK looks a lot better too.

    Cheers.

  • Carter

    I think a lot of Vancouver fans never got past the team’s seed number (3) to realize that they only finished 2 points ahead of the Kings in the West, while playing in a weaker division.

    If any series was going to be a tossup, it’s this one.

  • Carter

    I think a lot of Vancouver fans never got past the team’s seed number (3) to realize that they only finished 2 points ahead of the Kings in the West, while playing in a weaker division.

    If any series was going to be a tossup, it’s this one.

  • Robert

    Does anyone have any thoughts on the red spotlight bathing the Canuck goalies after Kings goals? I think this is something new at Staples and have not seen it anywhere else.

  • Robert

    Does anyone have any thoughts on the red spotlight bathing the Canuck goalies after Kings goals? I think this is something new at Staples and have not seen it anywhere else.

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