The Sergei Shirokov Situation

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9 Responses

  1. Nucks says:

    Bang on, though Lee Sweatt is certainly a legit defensive prospect as well.

  2. Kevinh says:

    The most important aspect of the Ballard deal was dumping Steve Bernier’s cement hands and 2 mil/year contract. Grabner was the cost of unloading Bernier. It was a great deal for Vancouver at the time. The swap of oversized salaries offset. Vancouver got a proven asset and Florida got a crap-shoot on Grabner–a crap shoot they lost by waiving him after a bad camp.

  3. Kevinh says:

    The most important aspect of the Ballard deal was dumping Steve Bernier’s cement hands and 2 mil/year contract. Grabner was the cost of unloading Bernier. It was a great deal for Vancouver at the time. The swap of oversized salaries offset. Vancouver got a proven asset and Florida got a crap-shoot on Grabner–a crap shoot they lost by waiving him after a bad camp.

  4. Travis says:

    what the heck is wrong with tanner glass? =S the guy is perfect on the fourth line..

  5. Ed Lau says:

    Nothing is wrong with Tanner Glass. I’m a huge fan of Glass as a 4th liner. I just think we haven’t had any stability on the 4th line except for him so that’s one of the very few areas the Canucks can look to improve on. Not a big deal but it’s one of the few cracks in our armor.

    I hope Glass is back next year.

  6. dave says:

    “Well, that and Florida doesn’t have anyone left we could fleece them for.”

    Are you kidding? Ballard and Oreskovich for a first round pick, Grabner and Bernier.

    At the time of this trade I thought THE CANUCKS got fleeced BY FLORIDA and Grabner has proven that. Florida was just even more retarded because they waived Grabner, the best player in the deal. Gillis has done a lot of good things, but this trade was brutal and had me questioning his competence.

    Shirokov should have been given more of a chance with the Canucks so that if we decide to trade him then he has more value. Same with Grabner. We traded him away when his stock was low instead of giving him more of a chance to showcase himself in the NHL and increase his value. If Gillis was more patient he would have gotten a much better deal.

    If I were Florida I would want to fleece Vancouver again but make better decisions with the players that are acquired.

  7. Ed Lau says:

    Again, Grabner was never going to break the Canucks lineup and he’s said himself several times that he did not have a good training camp. He didn’t have a good one in Florida either which led to him being waived and picked up by the NYI.

    Also, the Canucks filled a need and gave up nothing of real value. Yes, you can look at the trade as THREE first round picks for Ballard and Oreskovich or you can look at it as a low first rounder after the guy we wanted (Tinordi probably) was taken, a completely useless player that never found his feet in Vancouver (Bernier) and a prospect that again had a terrible training camp and wasn’t at the level of development he really should’ve been at. It’s incredibly easy to say in hindsight that we shouldn’t have traded a 30+ goal scoring rookie but that’s a once in awhile thing. How many rookies do you think show promise when they’re drafted but never make it since they can’t put it together at the NHL level?

    On the other hand, Ballard is a top-4 D man on just about any other team in the league. He’s just unlucky that he has four amazing defensemen ahead of him that could easily be the #1 or #2 guy on any team in the league.

    That’s why I like Gillis as a GM. Logic, rather than gut feeling, determines his decision making. I can’t stand it when GMs make decisions because they “like that kind of player”.

  8. Ed Lau says:

    As much as I like the way he handled himself during his call up, I don’t see that guy being top-6 at the NHL level. Size is more important on D than at forward. Sure, he might end up being a Visnovsky or Rafalski…two small-ish but good all around defensemen but I don’t think that’s likely.

  9. Even without Grabner, the Canucks still led the league in scoring. Without Ballard however – and given the number of injuries on the back end – the Canucks may well have had to rely on Yann Sauve and Evan Oberg even more.

    This was a good ol’ hockey trade. Some offensive depth for some defensive depth. As it turned out, the Canucks made the right decision as they needed the latter more than the former.

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