Oct 112013
 

If you’ve been off social media for the past couple of hours, you’ve likely missed the news that Alex Edler has been handed a 3 game suspension for the “illegal check to the head” of Tomas Hertl in last night’s game. And I’m likely about to say something that will upset a fair number of you.

I think three games for Edler is reasonable.

Alex Edler hits Mike Smith

Courtesy of AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin


While there is considerable debate to the legality of Edler’s hit itself – of note there was no call on the ice at the time – it’s hard to argue with Brendan “Banahammer” Shanahan’s assertion in his discipline video that the main point of impact is Hertl’s head (as you can see from the video below):

So why the suspension on what most are saying was a “legal” hockey hit (man am I overusing quotation marks)? It has everything to do with the first sentence of Rule 48 – Illegal Check to the Head

A hit resulting in contact with an opponent’s head where the head is targeted and the principal point of contact is not permitted.

While there are those who say Hertl hit Edler, I think we all agree a collision took place between and Edler’s arm/shoulder/body caught Hertl’s noggin square. Based on that fact alone, Edler violated Rule 48 and probably got off unfairly unscathed during the game.

For those of you who are about to castigate me in a public fashion, you’re not wrong in thinking there was no malice, intent, or recklessness involved – I don’t believe there was. But the language in the rule itself goes on further to accommodate that line of thought:

However, in determining whether such a hit should have been permitted, the circumstances of the hit, including whether the opponent put himself in a vulnerable position immediately prior to or simultaneously with the hit or the head contact on an otherwise legal body check was avoidable, can be considered.

As Shanahan explains in his video, these factors were taken into consideration when doling out supplementary discipline. And I would go as far as to say this whole issue would be moot had Edler made contact with anything other than Hertl’s head.

And lastly, this incident seems far too similar to Edler’s knee-on-knee hit on Eric Staal in last year’s World Cup – another incident where Edler appears slide down the train tracks before contact. With this one, I’ll let you be the judge:

Oct 102013
 
from the 2007 video "The Ultimate Canucks Haiku"

from the 2007 video “The Ultimate Canucks Haiku”

I love me a good haiku.  Perhaps it’s my half-Japanese heritage (Imoo is a Japanese name if you’re wondering; my other half is Chinese).  Perhaps it’s because I’m lazy and a haiku – with its 17 syllables – is one of the shortest poems in existence.  Or maybe it’s because my Ultimate Canucks Haiku video on YouTube (with over 30,000 views) helped me win some nice swag in the Ultimate Canucks Search contest back in 2007 (I’ve included the video at the bottom of this post).

Anyway, back to the syllables.  A proper haiku follows the form of 5-7-5.  That is: a line of 5 syllables, a line of 7 syllables, and then a line of 5 syllables.  Good haiku (or haikus…you can use either form for the plural) usually bunches the first two “lines” together, and then leaves the third line on its own to conclude the poem. Think of it as a 12-syllable phrase followed by a 5-syllable phrase.

Tonight, the San Jose Sharks are in town to face the Vancouver Canucks in a battle for early Pacific Division supremacy.  A big focal point of the Sharks will be their exciting rookie Tomas Hertl.  Hertl enters Thursday’s action leading the NHL in scoring in large part to a great 4-goal performance against the Rangers Tuesday night.

An already highly-anticipated match-up now has an added element of intrigue with Hertl.  Will the Canucks be able to avenge their opening night drubbing to the same Sharks?  Will Hertl continue his hot streak?  And will he dare try a fancy move against Roberto Luongo?

In advance of the game, I went to Twitter to solicit responses for a rather unique CHB Top 10.  Turns out we have a bunch of poets and didn’t even know it.  See what I did there?

Thus, I proudly present to you CHB’s Top 10 Hertl Haiku:

HM:  Hertl Hertl don’t u score on us.  Hertl Hertl please miss the bus.  –submitted by @manlycc

HM:  Ahead of the pack, a quartet he assembled.  Lu will stop him cold.  –submitted by @kdmurray

HM:  European kid never been in a fight so Bieksa will try.  –submitted by @mrsurreyjack

#10:  Cute goal by Hertl.  However three years ago, Daniel did it best.  –submitted by @ClasssicDave

#9:  Of all the damn luck Hertl is good with the puck.  Come, Lu – pull the plug!  -submitted by @cefair

#8:  Sharks are dangerous.  Laying Hertl on Rangers.  Sets up Thursday night. – submitted by @PuckedintheHead

#7:  Luongo, Schneider?  That was the past, this is now.  Luongo, Hertl. –submitted by @mikejang

#6:  I’m Czech Republic hockey player this is dream.  To play with sharks, ya? –submitted by @camcharron

#5:  Hertl is quite good – he scored four times on Tuesday.  Trade Weise for Hertl.  –submitted by @passittobulis

#4:  Thomas Hertl balls.  I’m just saying he’s got game.  I don’t mean his junk.  –submitted by @jamjamtao

#3:  Canucks take on Sharks – oh please Hertl, don’t hurt ‘em.  Bobby Lu, stand tall!  -submitted by @gloomybb

#2:  Look at that kid score.  Twenty, thirty, maybe more.  Unsustainable.  –submitted by @petbugs13

#1:  Who is this Hertl?  If you think he’s a bad guy, better Czech yourself.  –submitted by @rebeccapalooza and @camcharron

 

Jun 192012
 
Tom Wilson, Plymouth Whalers, NHL Entry Draft 2012

Photo credit: Sportsnet

The last time the Canucks drafted 26th overall in the NHL Entry Draft was in 2004 when they drafted a certain red-headed goaltender, Cory Schneider.

Schneider was the fourth goalie drafted that year, behind Al Montoya (6th overall, New York Rangers), Devan Dubnyk (14th, Edmonton Oilers) and Marek Schwartz (17th, St. Louis Blues).

It’s not likely the Canucks will draft another goalie with the 26th pick this year; in fact, since that 2004 draft, only 10 other goalies were picked in the first round.

As we approach draft day on Friday, the consensus seems to be that it is weak and unpredictable. There are some top-end talent in the first few picks, but after that, all bets are off.

Given their organizational depth and the general direction of the league, chances are Mike Gillis and company are looking for some big players up front. Big players who can skate and score.

Here are some of the guys who may fit that mold and what the experts are saying about them.

Thomas Wilson, RW, Plymouth (6’4″, 195 lbs., shoots right)

TSN: His skating continues to improve and he gets to the necessary places so as to create the literal and figurative impact in the game. Very good sense and he doesn’t run around aimlessly and his puck skills should not be underestimated because with the room he creates, he also can finish.

The Hockey News: The Plymouth Whalers power forward uses his big frame to punish his opponents and create scoring chances. And if someone doesn’t like it, he’s happy to drop the gloves.

The Scouting Report: Wilson is one of the biggest forwards in this draft and has developed into a true power forward. He’s an imposing winger who plays a gritty brand of hockey that has certainly caught the eye of NHL teams. He can change the complexion of a game when he engages physically and he has the ability to create a lot of space for his linemates through effective cycling.

Future Considerations: He skates very well for his size, wins the little battles along the boards, and in front of the net where he has a knack for scoring, and plays a solid north and south game. He is your prototypical power forward that can change the course of a game with a goal, a big hit, or a fight and holds the same potential to be an impact player in junior and at the pro level.

Brendan Gaunce, C, Belleville (6’2″, 215 lbs., shoots left)

TSN: He is smart and plays the game well both with and without the puck. He makes plays and because he’s smart he gets scoring chances and an improved shot can make him that much better offensively. He works without the puck and is also capable of playing on the wing which adds a component of versatility to his game.

NHL.com: A scout said if he were building a team from ground-up, Gaunce would be his first pick.

The Hockey Writers: Brendan Gaunce is a meat-and-potatoes type of player willing to enter the gritty areas and engage in puck battles. His defensive awareness, positioning on both sides of the puck and faceoff prowess earn him tough minutes as a shutdown option. Offensively, Gaunce plays a power game complemented by above-average passing skills and an ability to unleash a hot wrist in tight quarters.

Hockey Prospectus: Gaunce is a bulking two-way power forward who can also finish and distribute the puck at a high level. He is a really smart hockey player with tremendous instincts and vision on the ice. Even though he’s an aggressive checker, he also has the ability to pull up along the side boards, control a power play and be a very effective distributor.

Martin Frk, RW, Halifax (6’0″, 204 lbs., shoots right)

TSN: Martin is a goal scorer. He wants to score, is hungry to score and is that player who is lurking for the chance to score. He plays a straight ahead game and is more of a shooter. He has a good shot and can beat goaltenders with it down the wing and it’s a heavy shot.

MyNHLDraft.com: Frk’s commitment and drive has been questioned at times during his time with Halifax however it is quite clear when he is motivated he is the best player on the ice. This guy has an NHL shot and can shoot holes through the net. He already has a body that can withstand the physical punishment that the NHL offers and as well has a magnificent skill set to compliment his big body presence.

The Hockey Writers: A typical high-risk, high reward prospect, Frk could turn out to be an early second-round steal if he is developed properly by the team that drafts him.

Dobber Prospects: Frk is one of the top draft eligible players coming out of the QMJHL this year. Durability and consistency concerns could see him fall in the draft. He struggled once he returned, but started to produce during the last quarter of the season. His biggest asset is his booming shot, which might be among the best in the entire 2012 draft. He has a nasty, gritty side and is very strong on the puck.

Tomas Hertl, C, Slavia (6’2″, 198 lbs., shoots left)

TSN: He takes a cerebral approach which finds him in proper position on the ice but always ready to take advantage of opportunity. He forces opponents into mistakes without the puck and when he gains the puck, his awareness, vision and puck skills allow him to threaten offensively. He is a very good passer but given the opportunity to shoot, he can be dangerous.

NHL.com: Big and skilled, and already a star in the Czech league.

The Hockey News: Ice awareness and his ability to make plays are Hertl’s strongest assets.

Hockey Prospectus: Hertl is a gifted puck-handler who is above-average to plus in that area with good creativity and hand-eye coordination. He has a nice frame and is pretty hard to strip the puck from in the cycle game due to his hands and puck protection abilities. Hertl’s physical game is pretty solid all-around as he is strong, with a good sized frame, will go to the net, and doesn’t mind getting a little chippy.

Scott Laughton, C, Oshawa (6’0″, 177 lbs., shoots left)

TSN: He has excellent hockey sense and is capable of playing any situation in the game. He is smart defensively. He is smart offensively. He can adjust to different circumstances and excel. He leaves himself in strong position on the ice so he’s always ready to make the appropriate play for the situation.

OHL Prospects: I’ve said it before, but Laughton reminds me a lot of Mike Richards at the same age and I think there’s a chance he’s put himself in conversation for the back end of the first round.

The Hockey Guys: Despite competing heavily for ice-time on a veteran filled Generals’ team, Laughton proved that his strong two-way responsible game and tireless work ethic was too impressive to limit his minutes. As a true character player, Laughton has commendable offensive skills highlighted by above-average puck control and protects the puck exceptionally well. His vision and knack for reading his opponents is what makes him such a well-balanced pivot at both ends of the rink.

The Scouting Report: With no shortage of offensive firepower in Oshawa, Laughton’s minutes are not what they would be on other teams and he sees less powerplay time as a secondary option. With that being said, Laughton did show flashes of his offensive upside during the second half of the season while continuing his strong two-way play. Laughton isn’t an overly big player nor is he going to blow you away with speed, but he competes hard and is a strong checker.

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